Selection of Grants

Selection of Grants Funded in 2018

SPOTLIGHT:  Community Foundation of NJ in Partnership with the Fair Food Network

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HFNJ is proud to support a pilot of the Fair Food Network’s (FFN) Double Up healthy food incentive program in our region.  With Wakefern Food Corporation, a grant of $100,000 from HFNJ, and support from others, FFN will implement a technologically advanced Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP – formerly known as food stamps) in four area ShopRite grocery stores and participate in a groundbreaking online incentive ordering and delivery system.  The goal is to pilot methods to increase the purchase and consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables by providing incentives at point of purchase.  Recipients of food assistance in Newark and East Orange will be able to swipe their Electronic Benefit Transfer cards at two local ShopRite stores and receive a coupon when purchasing fresh fruit and vegetables to be used for a future purchase of additional fresh fruits and vegetables, up to $10 per purchase.

 

SPOTLIGHT:  JESPY HOUSE Residence for Aging in Place

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Last year, HFNJ provided funding to JESPY House to launch its Aging in Place Initiative.  This pilot program was based on the happy reality that people with developmental disabilities are living longer than ever before, and JESPY staff needed additional training to best meet their needs.  This year, JESPY is planning to open the first area residence for older adults with disabilities in a house donated by local philanthropists.  HFNJ has awarded a grant in the amount of $212,500 to equip the Michael Och House with an elevator and continue to develop the agency’s expertise and hire additional staff with skills necessary to meet clients’ changing clinical, behavioral, and physical needs.

 

 

SPOTLIGHT:  Caldwell University Graduate Art Therapy Internship Expansion

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In 2017, HFNJ provided funding to Caldwell University to construct a new home for its expanding dual degree Masters program in art and counseling.  The new space is creating a unique identity for the Art Therapy specialization program and its students. As a result of the enhanced learning environment and faculty engagement, the university has seen a significant increase in applications for this needed specialty.  Also last year, the Clinical Coordinator negotiated contracts with four local agencies to begin site programs:  Montclair Child Development in Orange, Youth Consultation Services in Orange, Daughters of Israel in West Orange, and Lester Senior Housing in Whippany.  She recruited four credentialed art therapist supervisors to function as Supervisory Fellows and worked with each agency to identify an on-site supervisor for day-to-day work with the intern.  In 2018, HFNJ funding in the amount of $42,460 will continue to support the engagement of qualified supervisors for the internship program.  We are convinced that various populations with mental health challenges can be better served clinically through art therapy approaches than with traditional talk therapy alone.  As the number of certified art therapists increases, the availability of supervisors at the agencies served should increase, obviating the need for outside Supervisory Fellows.

 

 

Selection of Grants Funded in 2017

SPOTLIGHT:  University Hospital Violence Intervention Program

This year HFNJ provided funding in the amount of $83,837 to establish a violence prevention program at University Hospital’s Level 1 Trauma Center.  In partnership with the Newark Community Street Team, a public safety initiative of Mayor Baraka and the Prudential Foundation, the hospital will use peer workers to reduce violence, broker conflicts, address trauma, and mentor clients in the high-crime South and West Wards.  Patients who have suffered gunshots or other penetrating wounds will be enrolled at the bedside and will be paired with peer workers who have lived experience and are willing to engage survivors in this effort.  The initial target population will be young men of color, aged 18-30.  Workers will support clients for at least one year.  The nurse manager and social worker from the Trauma Center will also participate and support clients accordingly.

 

SPOTLIGHT:  Shani Baraka Women’s Resource Center

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The Shani Baraka Women’s Resource Center opened in May, 2017 to provide neighborhood-based social services and resources in Newark’s South Ward for women in crisis.  The building houses the Newark Police Department’s Domestic Violence and Special Victims Units in addition to the services of the Center.  HFNJ support ($101,000) will enable the Center to establish evening hours and hire an additional counselor, substance abuse specialist, and child care professional to better serve working women.  Individual counseling and groups will assist women as they attempt to cope with trauma, substance abuse, grief, and parenting issues, and will foster a sense of wellness and support.

 

SPOTLIGHT:  Clara Maass MC Center of Excellent for Latino Health

Clara Maass MC received funding ($139,820) to strengthen its outreach to the Latino community and ensure that patients receive the highest quality care.  HFNJ funding will enable Clara Maass to hire its first dedicated staff person for its new Center of Excellence, who will work in the community to identify patients in need of culturally-sensitive care:  primary and specialty care, inpatient and outpatient services, transitions of care, and end of life care. S/he will also provide appropriate trainings for regular hospital staff to ensure that all employees understand ways to better serve the Latino population.

 

SPOTLIGHT:  JESPY House Aging in Place Initiative

Adults with learning and intellectual disabilities are living significantly longer than in previous generations and are more likely to experience poorer health and earlier onset age-related conditions than other adults.  To address this problem, HFNJ provided funding to JESPY House ($193,388) to strengthen, expand, and integrate services and supports for the older-adults who live in its residences or utilize its day programs.  The program will include staff training; individual and group support counseling; part-time occupational and physical therapists; increased hours for an LPN to conduct assessments/screenings, monitor medical conditions/prescribe treatments, facilitate medical appointments/hospital visits, and deliver health education workshops; and a full time Clinical Director to increase the capacity of the agency’s clinical team.

 

SPOTLIGHT:  Fp Youth Outcry Trauma Recovery Center Pilot

Fp Youth Outcry is a grassroots youth organization located in the Willie Wright Apartments in Newark’s Central Ward.  The organization was formed in 2006 to help young people and families heal from violence and victimization.  Close to 100% of the children who participate in the agency’s free programs are victims of, or have been exposed to, violent crime.  HFNJ funding ($25,000) will establish on-site counseling and trauma recovery services, adding a PT licensed social worker trained in trauma, a grief counselor, and victims’ advocacy services.  Funding will also support trauma/strategies training for program facilitators to better equip them to handle anger, conflict, and other emotions triggered during sessions.  The goal:  to systematically address grief and loss among participating youth and their parents, increase coping and social skills, improve communications, develop healthy family interactions, and achieve a greater sense of healing and support.

 

SPOTLIGHT:  NJ Chapter, American Academy of Pediatrics Dental Healthcare Pilot

Focusing on infants and young children 0-7, this pilot will forge a pediatric practice model integrating oral healthcare into a child’s wellness visit starting in infancy.  A Dental Health Care Coordinator will support three pediatric practices – all of which participate in NJ Family Care/Medicaid – to implement routine oral health practices including family education, screenings, fluoride varnishing, and linkages to area dentists.  Partnering dentists will ensure access to a dental home.  The goal:  to reduce barriers to oral health screenings/treatment, increase access, and improve oral health through new, consistent embedded practices.

 

 

Selection of Grants Funded in 2016

SPOTLIGHT:  Integrated Pediatric Primary Care

From its inception, HFNJ has been focused on the healthy development of children, under-standing that children whose physical, emotional, developmental, and dental needs are not addressed and nurtured cannot grow to fulfill their potential.  In 2016, after a year or more of research and networking, HFNJ embarked upon a very special initiative to integrate behavioral healthcare and dentistry with traditional pediatric practices.  The following initiatives were funded:

Newark Beth Israel MC Foundation ($226,489) to test and refine the first fully integrated pediatric practice in the region at Children’s Hospital of NJ.  The hospital will implement a new collaborative care model at its Pediatric Health Center.  Funding underwrites the hires of a full-time psychologist, embedding behavioral and developmental testing, intakes, and treatment within the pediatric setting; a full time navigator to contact baseline screenings and intensively coordinate care; and the purchase of technology to enable the tracking and analysis of results.

St. James Health ($200,000) to establish integrated primary, dental, and behavioral care for children and caregivers.  The agency will use a care team model, with a primary focus on children, new mothers, and pregnant women with the goal of replacing episodic, crisis care with a medical home and health system that advances healthy development.

NJCRI ($146,293) to add pediatric and prenatal services using its existing Living Well adult model of integrated primary care and behavioral health.  Funding supports a clinical care team consisting of a part-time pediatrician experienced in serving HIV+ and high-risk children and families, an OB nurse practitioner, a dentist, and a care manager.  Mental health services are provided by existing NJCRI staff.

Rutgers Community Health Center ($189,750) to establish a multidisciplinary, dedicated pediatric primary care team that includes community health workers to support the healthy development of infants and children 0-21 living in public housing in East Newark.

Main Street Counseling ($65,000) to integrate behavioral healthcare into the school-based health center at Newark’s 13th Avenue School in partnership with Jewish Renaissance Medical Center.  The agencies will work together to establish bidirectional referrals and a joint system to increase access to primary care.  JFMC will establish a behavioral health protocol as part of the primary care visit for younger patients (6-10) and expand the electronic medical record system.  All students will have access to Main Street’s consultant psychiatrist.

 

SPOTLIGHT:  Memory Care for Adults with Mild to Moderate Dementia

It became apparent this year that the Jewish community had no programs to offer to older adults suffering mild to moderate dementia.  Spurred by numerous requests from the community and the generosity of Jonathan Littman and his family, the JCC of MetroWest NJ came to HFNJ for a matching grant to establish the Littman Memory Center in partnership with Jewish Family service of MetroWest.

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HFNJ provided $50,000 to augment a $100,000 donation from the Littmans, enabling the Center to open and provide enrichment and supportive services for  participants and their families for at least three years.

 

 

 

SPOTLIGHT:  Creating understanding and reducing violence through community dialogue.

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Concerned about the prevalence of trauma experienced by those living and working in Newark, and the lack of understanding between police and other first responders and community members, HFNJ this year funded Equal Justice USA ($142,127) to conduct a training program for Newark Police Officers and other first responders to foster better relationships, de-escalate crisis situations, and address their own stress and vicarious trauma.

 

 

 

 

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